Sugar and Sweeteners

For healing and disease prevention it is preferable to use the safer sweeteners listed below in relatively small quantities as long as you TEST for them.


For Diabetics
Not Advised:

• Organic fruit
• Raw honey
• Pure maple syrup

Better:
• 4 oz. fruit juice
• Amasake/Brown Rice Syrup/Yinnie Syrup
o Made with brown rice and a culture that’s cooked to a syrup. Half as sweet as white sugar, its mild flavor is similar to butterscotch. It’s very good for cooking, baking, and in drinks or marinades. Be sure to read labels because some brands include barley malt and corn syrup.
• Fructooligosaccharides (FOS)
o A sweetener extracted from fruits and vegetables including bananas, onions, chicory root, asparagus, leeks, and Jerusalem artichoke which has the highest concentration of FOS. It is particularly useful for Candida overgrowth patients, because it supports the growth of beneficial bacteria and is sometimes added to yogurt.

Best:

• Muscovado (Sucanat, Rapadura)
o Muscovado sugar is made from unrefined, evaporated cane juice. Unlike processing for white sugar, the molasses is not parated from the sugar stream when the cane is crushed. The final product is crystalline, retaining its natural molasses and trace vitamins and minerals.
o Rapadura is a brand name for organic, unrefined, evaporated cane juice with a fine, granular texture. As with muscovado, the molasses is not separated from the sugar stream when the cane is crushed, which helps retain trace minerals and nutrients. Rapadura is produced under a fair labor program known as Hand in Hand.
o Sucanat is a brand name for another organic, unrefined evaporated cane juice with its natural molasses intact. Like Rapadura, it has a fine-grained texture, achieved by handpaddling the sugar syrup until it’s cool and dry. Sucanat is a Fair Trade Certified product.
• Barley Malt
o Comes from sprouted barley that’s roasted and cooked down to a syrup. Its malt-like flavor is good for baking with squash, barbecue, and sweet and sour sauces. Mix a spoonful into milk or a non-dairy beverage for a “malted.” Be sure to read labels because brands sold at other stores may contain corn syrup or refined sugar.
• Stevia
o Derived from a perennial shrub with leaves 300-times sweeter than sugar. It has no calories and may be useful for people with diabetes, hypoglycemia or candida. Available in powdered, liquid, concentrate, tea or tablet form.
• Molasses
o A by-product of refining sugar cane. Sweet, light Barbados molasses is extracted from the first press of sugar cane. Blackstrap, which is slightly sweet, comes from the final press and is a source of iron and calcium. “Unsulphured molasses” indicates no sulphur dioxide was used in extraction or as a preservative.

For Non-Diabetics:
Good:

• Muscovado (Sucanat, Rapadura)
o Muscovado sugar is made from unrefined, evaporated cane juice. Unlike processing for white sugar, the molasses is not parated from the sugar stream when the cane is crushed. The final product is crystalline, retaining its natural molasses and trace vitamins and minerals.
o Rapadura is a brand name for organic, unrefined, evaporated cane juice with a fine, granular texture. As with muscovado, the molasses is not separated from the sugar stream when the cane is crushed, which helps retain trace minerals and nutrients. Rapadura is produced under a fair labor program known as Hand in Hand.
o Sucanat is a brand name for another organic, unrefined evaporated cane juice with its natural molasses intact. Like Rapadura, it has a fine-grained texture, achieved by handpaddling the sugar syrup until it’s cool and dry. Sucanat is a Fair Trade Certified product.
• Barley Malt
o Comes from sprouted barley that’s roasted and cooked down to a syrup. Its malt-like flavor is good for baking with squash, barbecue, and sweet and sour sauces. Mix a spoonful into milk or a non-dairy beverage for a “malted.” Be sure to read labels because brands sold at other stores may contain corn syrup or refined sugar.
• Stevia
o Derived from a perennial shrub with leaves 300-times sweeter than sugar. It has no calories and may be useful for people with diabetes, hypoglycemia or candida. Available in powdered, liquid, concentrate, tea or tablet form.

Better:
• 4 oz. fruit juice
• Amasake/Brown Rice Syrup/Yinnie Syrup
o Made with brown rice and a culture that’s cooked to a syrup. Half as sweet as white sugar, its mild flavor is similar to butterscotch. It’s very good for cooking, baking, and in drinks or marinades. Be sure to read labels because some brands include barley malt and corn syrup.
• Fructooligosaccharides (FOS)
o A sweetener extracted from fruits and vegetables including bananas, onions, chicory root, asparagus, leeks, and Jerusalem artichoke which has the highest concentration of FOS. It is particularly useful for Candida overgrowth patients, because it supports the growth of beneficial bacteria and is sometimes added to yogurt.

Best:
• Organic fruit
• Raw honey
• Pure maple syrup
• Molasses
o A by-product of refining sugar cane. Sweet, light Barbados molasses is extracted from the first press of sugar cane. Blackstrap, which is slightly sweet, comes from the final press and is a source of iron and calcium. “Unsulphured molasses” indicates no sulphur dioxide was used in extraction or as a preservative.

Toxic Sweeteners to Avoid
Read all labels on packaged food and gum carefully to verify that these are not included.
White Sugar
Brown Sugar
Raw Sugar
Fructose
D-tagatose
Corn syrup (any form)
Dextrose
Artificial sweeteners:
• Neotame, aspartame
o NutraSweet
o Equal
• Sucralose
o Splenda
• Acesulfame-k
o Sunette
o Sweet-n-Safe
o Sweet One
**Xylitol because we do not always know what the source is – it comes from corncobs and if not organic, may be genetically modified.


Replacing white sugar in a recipe, try these substitutions:

Sweetener Amount to replace 1 cup sugar Adjustments to recipe
Barley malt syrup* 1 1/3 cup Reduce liquids by one-fourth. Add 1/4 teaspoon baking soda for each cup syrup to help baked goods rise.**
Brown rice syrup* 1 1/4 cup Reduce liquid by one-fourth and add 1/4 teaspoon baking soda for each cup syrup to help baked goods rise.**
Frozen juice concentrate 2/3 cup Reduce liquids by one-third and add 1/4 teaspoon baking soda per cup of concentrate.**
Honey 1/2 cup Reduce liquids by one-eighth. Reduce oven temperature by 25 degrees and cook a bit longer.
Maple syrup 1/2 to 2/3 cup Reduce liquid by one-fourth and add 1 teaspoon baking soda per cup of syrup.**
Molasses 1 1/3 cup sweet molasses Reduce liquid by 6 tablespoons and add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda per cup of molasses.***
Stevia Read labels for powder, liquid or concentrate. Follow suggestions on product label.
Sugar cane juice
(Rapadura, Sucanat, muscovado, turbinado, demerara) 1 cup none

* If you use barley malt or brown rice syrups in baked goods, be aware that a natural enzyme in these sweeteners may liquefy the consistency of the batter. This is more likely when eggs are not used. To prevent liquefying eggless recipes, first boil the barley malt or brown rice syrup for 2 to 3 minutes, cool, then measure and use.
** For each 1/4 teaspoon baking soda, reduce salt by 1/4 teaspoon.
*** Do not substitute more than half the sugar in a recipe with molasses; blackstrap is not sweet – taste test mixtures.